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Why travelers don't want to visit the US

Is it fear of terrorism which makes people want to avoid visiting the US? Nope! The crime there? No, again.

This report on Travelmole reveals why travellers are checking out from visiting the US. Having experienced Immigration and Customs entry points to, and officials in America, MPS shares the view of those surveyed that the "welcome" mat is certainly not out. Underlying the entire entry process seems to be a belief that one is either a terrorist or hell-bent on becoming an illegal immigrant.

"If you thought of crime…or terrorism…think again.

"Travelers are more afraid of US government officials than the threat of terrorism or crime," says Geoff Freeman, executive director of the Discover America Partnership. He added:

"Whether it's reality or not doesn't matter," he says. "We have a problem on our hands."

A Discover America survey has found that by a margin of more than two to one, the US ranked first among 10 destinations that included Africa and the Middle East as the most unfriendly to international travelers.

More than half of those polled said immigration officials are rude, and that the US government does not want their travel business.

Almost two-third came up with a concern that might surprise Americans -- foreign tourists were worried they will be detained for hours because of a simple mistake or a misstatement at a US airport."

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