Skip to main content

Farce added to disgrace and shame.....

"In keeping with the Rumsfeld adage "Stuff happens" and given the Senate Armed Services Committee's timidity, no senior U.S. Army officer or defense official is likely to be held accountable for the torture, "ghost" prisoners, and other abuses at Abu Ghraib.

Only the bad apples at the bottom; none of the rotten ones at the top. Not the commander in chief, who authorized torture with his memorandum of Feb. 7, 2002, announcing and implementing a new policy that detainees be treated "humanely, as appropriate, and as consistent with military necessity." Not then-Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, nor his deputy Paul Wolfowitz, nor U.S. pro-consul Paul Bremer, nor troop commander Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, nor Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller (in charge of Gitmo-izing Abu Ghraib), nor Sanchez's intelligence chief Maj. Gen. Barbara Fast, nor National Security Council functionary Frances Townsend.

All of the above visited Abu Ghraib during the torture year of 2003 before the photos surfaced the next year. Had it never occurred to them that their incessant pressure on Army interrogators to find nonexistent WMD in Iraq and nonexistent ties between Iraq and al-Qaeda, together with the expanded list of torture techniques duly approved by hired-gun lawyers in the Pentagon, the office of the vice president and the Department of Justice, would lead to the abuses of Abu Ghraib?

Not to mention things like the marginal notes from Rumsfeld, on the list of torture techniques, "Make sure this happens."

The fact that no one will be "punished" for the outrages at Abu Ghraib, as this past week has shown, adds farce to the disgraceful and shameful conduct of those at the prison itself, the relevant commanders and the politicians who knew what was afoot.

Sam Provance, a former sergeant specializing in intelligence analysis, refused to remain silent about the torture at Abu Ghraib, where he served for five months at the height of the abuses. He was punished for refusing to take part in the coverup, and pushed out of the Army. His article, part of which is above, appeared in AlterNet here.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Oh yer?

Credited to Nick Anderson

Donald T: First seduced..... then betrayed!

All those supporters of Trump - who, heaven's only knows, got him headed for the White House - are in a for more than a rude awakening and shock.   Whatever Trump "promised" is just not going to happen....as Paul Krugman so clearly spells out in his latest op-ed piece "Seduced and Betrayed by Donald Trump" in The New York Times.

"Donald Trump won the Electoral College (though not the popular vote) on the strength of overwhelming support from working-class whites, who feel left behind by a changing economy and society. And they’re about to get their reward — the same reward that, throughout Mr. Trump’s career, has come to everyone who trusted his good intentions. Think Trump University.

Yes, the white working class is about to be betrayed.

The evidence of that coming betrayal is obvious in the choice of an array of pro-corporate, anti-labor figures for key positions. In particular, the most important story of the week — seriously, people, stop focusing on Trum…

Snooping..... at its worst

The Brits have just brought in legislation which allows for unprecedented "snooping" in a Western democracy - says Edward Snowden.   Let truthdig explain....

"On Tuesday, the United Kingdom instated the Investigatory Powers Act 2016, a piece of legislation described by whistleblower Edward Snowden as “the most extreme surveillance in the history of western democracy.”

The law, informally known as the “Snooper’s Charter,” spent over a year in Parliament before it was passed. The Guardian reported:

"The new surveillance law requires web and phone companies to store everyone’s web browsing histories for 12 months and give the police, security services and official agencies unprecedented access to the data.

It also provides the security services and police with new powers to hack into computers and phones and to collect communications data in bulk. The law requires judges to sign off police requests to view journalists’ call and web records, but the measure has been descri…