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Looking over our shoulders...and worse! Handing over info about you and me

We really need to be concerned about what snooping our governments have been engaged.  Forget the Chinese.    Our elected representatives have taken upon themselves a licence to intrude it our lives and abrogate our right to privacy.  The mantra to justify all of that?    The "war on terror".      It doesn't wash.

All too sadly, the general populace doesn't appreciate the dangerous slippery slope going on here.    It's a subject taken up in this Comment is Free piece "Where is the outrage over Prism in Australia?" in The Guardian:

"Politicians and journalists ignore public opinion at their peril. Less than two weeks after the explosive revelations by former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden on the creation of a privatised, American surveillance apparatus, a TIME poll finds a majority of Americans support the leak, and Snowden receives a higher approval rating than US citizens view Congress. History has also been kind to one of the great leakers in history, the Pentagon Paper’s Daniel Ellsberg (who backs Snowden, too). Never under-estimate the public’s desire to discover what the state is doing in its name.

In Australia, however, the story has barely caused a ripple. Attorney general Mark Dreyfus refuses to acknowledge that Canberra receives information from the Prism system, instead saying that Australians should rest easy and feel protected by the warm glow of intelligence sharing with Washington. In reality, evidence has emerged that the Labor government is building a massive data storage facility to manage massive amounts of information from the US. Unsurprisingly, the US claims its monitoring is proportionate and legal, despite some members of Congress having no idea of the scope of the secret programs.

This is spying by any other name – and Snowden makes clear that everybody is doing it, despite protestations from Australia and America that only China is unleashing constant cyber attacks (Foreign Policy recently revealed that the NSA hacks into Chinese systems)."


If one wants see, graphically, what has been handed over, look no further than this piece "Here's How Often Google and Facebook Say Yes to Government Snoops" on Mother Jones.




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