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So, what if Trump does win?

Scary and horrifying as it might seem, at the time of writing (and this post) Trump is ahead in the presidential election account.

Let us assume he does win, what could it all mean?

Kumuda Simpson, a lecturer in International Relations at La Trobe University, writing on ABC News (in Australia) analyses what might follow from a Trump win.

"After a gruelling and often highly antagonist election, Americans will vote today for the next US president and several key policy areas that will require leadership that is thoughtful, creative and aimed at uniting a divided country.

But it is not just domestic policy that will be shaped by the next president.

Whether it is Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump, the president will have a fundamental role in shaping global affairs for the foreseeable future.

For this reason, it's worth examining what is at stake for America and the world."


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