Skip to main content

Do the Brits have a revolution on their hands?

Politics is a strange game......and probably more so in 2010 as voters are jaded and angry with their elected representatives.

Watching the electioneering unfold in the United Kingdom has been fascinating as a "new" candidate steals the limelight and poses a real threat to the died-in-the-wool established Labour and Conservative parties.

Anne Applebaum on Slate reports on the man everyone has his or her eyes on, Nick Clegg:

"Here is a riddle: What would the Tea Party movement look like if it were British, privately educated, and had once worked as a ski instructor in Austria?

Here is the answer: It would look like Nick Clegg, leader of the British Liberal Democrats—and possibly the beneficiary of the biggest British voters' revolution in decades. For those who don't follow these things, the Liberal Democrats are Britain's historically insignificant third party. In its current incarnation, the party dates from the late 1980s, back when the Labor Party was a near-Marxist monolith, the Tories were the party of Margaret Thatcher, and there was a lot of space in between."

Continue reading here.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Wow!.....some "visitor" to Ferryland in Newfoundland

So, which are the democratic countries in Europe?

It's probably taken by most that all the countries in Europe are equally democratic. Not so, concludes a survey. Some are more democratic than others.

"Denmark's democracy is in rude health while the political systems of Britain and France have some major shortcomings, according to a new Swiss-German study ranking the quality of democracy in 30 nations. Germany achieves a respectable score but falls short of a top 10 slot.

Germany is more democratic than France, Britain and even Switzerland, according to a study released last week by the University of Zurich and the Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB), a research institute funded by the German government.

The 'democracy barometer' measures how well 30 established democracies implement the principles of freedom and equality. Denmark gets top marks, while Britain and France are found wanting, ranking 26th and 27th respectively. Costa Rica came last, just behind South Africa and Poland.

The study spans the …