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Does anyone (apart from Donald) really want to cosy up to Putin?

There is nothing new about being wary of Putin and his cronies, but given the Trump White House having shown a propensity to be "talking" with the Kremlin more than one might have thought prudent, CQ highlights some recent happenings relating to Putin which ought to put anyone on guard about cosying up to the Russians.

"Considering the current state of the news cycle, specifically as it pertains to President Trump and his cronies' deep and abiding love for all things Russian, it's probably a good idea for us as a nation to start keeping more of an eye on what's happening with Putin and company. So what's going on in the land of winter and Bond villains? Well, it turns out it's not just the deaths of investigative journalists that are strange and suspicious. No, in the last six months, seven different Russian officials have died unexpectedly, and many under shady circumstances.

First, on the day Donald Trump was elected, a Russian diplomat named Sergei Krivov died in New York. Here's how BuzzFeed explained it:


He was found just before 7 a.m. on Election Day, lying on the floor of the Russian Consulate on the Upper East Side. The man was unconscious and unresponsive, with an unidentified head wound — “blunt force trauma,” in cop parlance. By the time emergency responders reached him, he was dead.


The Russians seemingly changed their story quickly and claimed Krivov had a heart attack. You know, in that normal thing where "unidentified head wounds" come from heart attacks, right?


Then, on December 19, Russia's ambassador to Turkey, Andrei Karlov, was very famously assassinated at an art exhibit. You saw the photos. That was intense enough, but then on the VERY SAME DAY, a member of the Latin American department of the Russian Foreign Ministry named Peter Polshikov was shot and killed in his apartment.


That alone would be weird and creepy, but since late 2016, there's been a slew of odd-seeming deaths: Russia's ambassador to the United Nations, Vitaly Churkin, died of a heart attack in New York; Russia's ambassador to India, Alexander Kadakin, died of a "brief illness," according to the Times of India; and Russian consul Andrei Malanin was found dead in his apartment in Greece. And that doesn't even include the fact that ex-KGB general Oleg Erovinkin, who is suspected of aiding the MI-6 agent who allegedly assembled the famous pee-pee dossier on Trump, was found dead in the back of his car.


Now, do we know that foul play happened in these cases? No. Of course not. But is it suspicious? Of course it is. And what is possibly most terrifying is that our current president and his administration are working overtime to hide what looks like abundant connections to that government. You know that old saying: Politics makes strange bedfellows. And playing footsie with Russia makes murderous-seeming bedfellows."

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