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That's a lot of coffee!

Here is an "interesting" way of putting into perspective the earnings of a CEO....

"It’s still a lot of java.

Starbucks Corp. Chief Executive Officer Howard Schultz received $20.1 million in reported compensation last year, the Seattle-based company said in a filing Monday, down from $21.5 million in 2014. Measured in his favorite beverage, the value of his pay is enough to buy almost 9 million espresso macchiatos -- or 24,400 each day for a year.

The pay included $1.5 million in salary, a $4 million cash bonus and $14.4 million in stock options and restricted shares. The equity vests over the next few years, some of it based on how well the company performs. The Italian-style macchiato, made up by two shots of espresso and a touch of steamed milk foam, sells for $2.25 at the Starbucks at 1962 First Ave. South in Seattle, a short walk from the company’s headquarters."

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