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TPP slammed

The TPP. It's now been released publicly.   And its' been already slammed from all quarters.   Read what CommonDreams "reports" in "'Worse Than We Thought': TPP A Total Corporate Power Grab Nightmare" as the reaction in the USA to the TPP.

"Worse than anything we could've imagined."

"An act of climate denial."

"Giveaway to big agribusiness."

"A death warrant for the open Internet."

"Worst nightmare."

"A disaster."

As expert analysis of the long-shrouded, newly publicized TransPacific Partnership (TPP) final text continued to roll out on Thursday, consensus formed around one fundamental assessment of the 12-nation pact: It's worse than we thought.

"From leaks, we knew quite a bit about the agreement, but in chapter after chapter the final text is worse than we expected."
—Lori Wallach, Public Citizen's Global Trade Watch
"From leaks, we knew quite a bit about the agreement, but in chapter after chapter the final text is worse than we expected with the demands of the 500 official U.S. trade advisers representing corporate interests satisfied to the detriment of the public interest," said Lori Wallach, director of Public Citizen's Global Trade Watch.

In fact, Public Citizen charged, the TPP rolls back past public interest reforms to the U.S. trade model while expanding  problematic provisions demanded by the hundreds of official U.S. corporate trade advisers who had a hand in the negotiations while citizens were left in the dark.

On issues ranging from climate change to food safety, from open Internet to access to medicines, the TPP "is a disaster," declared Nick Dearden of Global Justice Now.

"Now that we’ve seen the full text, it turns out the job-killing TPP is worse than anything we could’ve imagined," added Charles Chamberlain, executive director of Democracy for America. "This agreement would push down wages, flood our nation with unsafe imported food, raise the price of life-saving medicine, all the while trading with countries where gays and single mothers can be stoned to death."

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